Brass Astronomical and Astrological Instruments

Lehman Associates is proud to present a line of antique design brass astronomical and astrological instruments that are fully functional, even the miniatures. Of course, with all such instruments, the larger the instrument, the more accurate the reading.

Note: all items shown in green will be available to ship in time for Christmas.

 

Traditional Astrological and Navigational Brass Instruments for Sale:

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H24 Nocturlabe or Nocturnal
($140.00)
This nocturnal watch ––horologium nocturnale– is an astronomical instrument used to measure the time through the observation of the Pole Star and the position of bright stars in the celestial sphere. This nocturnal is a reproduction of the one made in 1570 by Girolamo della Volpaia. 5.51″ in diameter.

 

H28 Nautical Quadrant
($70.00)
The quadrant or clinometer was an instrument that was used to measure angles up to 90°. Generally made of either wood or brass, at sea, they were used to help to measure the latitude. Set for 51.5° N latitude and for local hours. 4.58″ x 3.33″.
H32 Planispherical Astrolabe
($135.00)
From the Greek word astro, meaning star, and labio, “that which searches, this complex instrument has many other applications, including finding house cusps. Set for 50° latitude. 5.11” in diameter.

 

H35 Planispheric Astrolabe
($ 350.00)
From the Greek for “star searcher” this instrument was introduced in Europe by the Arabs. Among other calculations one can establish the height of the Sun, the planets and the stars, determine time and Latitude, measure heights, calculate distances and astrological house cusps. Set for 40.4 latitude. 7.87″ in diameter.

 

H36 Eastern Planispherical Astrolabe
($145.00)
This piece is based on the astrolabe made by the famous craftsman Diya’al Din Muhammad (1647, Lahore). This is not an exact replica but a similar piece in the Oriental style, and updated. The rete is updated, with a regula, adapted the limbus following traditional “European” instruments. Set for latitude 21º32’. Approximately 5” in diameter.
H38 Lunar Calendar
($ 125.00)
It’s hard to develop a calendar for the age of the Moon exactly, but this device does the job! Created in the style of the 16th and 17th century instrument masters, this device is calibrated for the 21st century, using the once familiar instrument type known as a volvelle.
H41 Wood Nautical Compass
($ 38.00)
The first written references about the use of the navigation needle by Mediterranean seamen dates to the 12th century. 1.37″ in diameter.

 

H43 Cardan or Marine Compass
($ 120.00)
The marine compass, invented by astrologer Jerome Cardan, is a nautical instrument devised because the rock and pitch of a vessel make ordinary compasses useless. Ship compasses were mounted in a Cardan suspension, which allowed them to remain constantly level. 3.94″ in diameter,

 

H45 Urania Propitia ($80.00) “Urania propitia” (1650), the title of Maria Cunitz´s book was transformed, thanks to her outstanding scientific achievements, in her nickname: “she who is closest to the muse of Astronomy “. There is a sundial of folding gnomon, mounted on a compass. 3.31” in diameter.
H46 Brass Pocket Compass ($63.00) This piece is a fun gadget that combines two different objects: a portable compass and the classic pocket case watch, which was for centuries a regular ornament and symbol of distinction. 1.77″ in diameter.
H80 Astrolabe Keyring ($45.00) The Astrolabe, considered the mathematical jewel of the Medieval Age, was until the end of XVII century the primo astrological instrument. It also demonstrates the celestial mechanism and the apparent movement of the stars. Set for 41° latitude. 1.77″ in diameter. (Note: the miniatures and keyrings are the same size device for each type.)
H81 Astrolabe Miniature ($45.00) The Astrolabe, considered the mathematical jewel of the Medieval Age, was until the end of XVII century the primo astrological instrument. It also demonstrates the celestial mechanism and the apparent movement of the stars. Set for 41° latitude. 1.77″ in diameter. (Note: the miniatures and keyrings are the same size device for each type.)
H84 Nocturlabe Keyring
($ 45.00)
The piece is a reproduction of an instrument dated 1570 and signed by Humphrey Cole. This instrument appeared at the beginning of the 16th century and began to disappear in the 18th century. This piece was made to calculate the time with the Pole Star and Kochab. 2.08″ in diameter. (Note: the miniatures and keyrings are the same size device for each type.)

 

H85 Nocturlabe Miniature
($ 45.00)
The piece is a reproduction of an instrument dated 1570 and signed by Humphrey Cole. This instrument appeared at the beginning of the 16th century and began to disappear in the 18th century. This piece was made to calculate the time with the Pole Star and Kochab. 2.08″ in diameter. (Note: the miniatures and keyrings are the same size device for each type.)
H89 Astronomical Ring Miniature
($ 48.00)
Although known as the Astronomic Ring Dial (Annulus Astronomicus), the complete name of this instrument used to determine the solar time and to make other astronomical measurements is the Universal Equinoctial Ring Sundial. Set for 40° 24′ latitude. 1.77″ in diameter.
H92 Astrolabe Keyring ($45.00) This piece is based on the astrolabe made by the famous craftsman Diya’al Din Muhammad (1647, Lahore). This is not an exact replica but a similar piece in the Oriental style, and updated. The rete is updated, with a regula, adapted the limbus following traditional “European” instruments. Set for latitude 21º32’. Approximately 1.7” in diameter. .
H95 Astrolabe Miniature ($45.00) This piece is based on the astrolabe made by the famous craftsman Diya’al Din Muhammad (1647, Lahore). This is not an exact replica but a similar piece in the Oriental style, and updated. The rete is updated, with a regula, adapted the limbus following traditional “European” instruments. Set for latitude 21º32’. Approximately 1.7” in diameter. Same item as H92 except for being on a stand instead of a keyring .
H93 Tide Computer keyring
($ 45.00)
This piece is a replica of a Tidal Abacus from 1570, signed by Humphrey Cole. Currently this instrument can be found in the British Museum, London. One of its faces is a Tidal Abacus and the other is a Nocturnal. 1.97″ in diameter. This is the tide computer side only.